Tag Archives: woven bands

How to weave inkle bands on the Mirrix loom part one

I love weaving inkle (warp face) bands.

I use  in dollmaking:

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Link to purchase pattern for Inkle dolls: Inkle Dolls

And, they are wonderful for trimming handwoven clothing:

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Link to post that shows how to shape inkle bands to make a yoke or other shaped pieces of garments: Warp pulling

Over the years,  I have also made hat bands, book marks, all kinds of jewelry, key fobs,  vests, bags, bag handles, the garters for the men’s kilt hose for my son’s wedding, shawls, freeform pieces that combine inkle weaving, knitting, embroidery, spool knitting and crochet, as well as rugs.

Yep. I love inkle weaving.

So, as I have been exploring the possibilities of weaving with my Mirrix looms, I had to give inkle weaving a try.

I found that it was quite challenging at first. But, I don’t give up easily 🙂

I ended up spending waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more hours than I should have, experimenting and obsessing over making inkle bands on the Mirrix.

Well… I finally succeeded.

Since it was so challenging, I figured that I should share what I have learned, so that other intrepid inkle weavers can leap right in, without all the trial,  error and frogging that I went through!

There are definitely tricks to weaving inkle bands on the Mirrix looms, and I have made 4 videos to share those tricks.

Here’s part one of the video:

Here is the draft for the bands that I wove in the videos:

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To read the draft: Each square represents one warp strand.

You can check your warping by looking at each shed to see that it has the same number of strands, in the order that they appear in the line.

You will be  putting a total of 8 green strands on, followed by 4 orange strands, 3 sets of  (1 orange, 1 green) for a total of 6 strands, then 4 orange strands and ending with 8 green strands.

At the top and bottom of the loom, you’ll see the full count of warp strands.

At the warping bar, the 2 sheds will be separated into their correct (we hope!) configuration for each shed.

The chart will give you bands like this:

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The upper band is the band on the right hand side of the loom in videos 2 – 4.

I only used the center of the draft for it, without the green border strands.

The yarn is Lion Brand Cotton.

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Setting up the loom for inkle bands is different than normal warping.

You need to have the warping bar at the front of the loom.

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Tie the green yarn onto the warping bar and take it up and around the loom, just the same as if the warping bar was in the back.

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You will need to cut the warp strand of color 1 to tie on color 2 at the warping bar, for EVERY color change.

WHAT?!?!?!

Yes. really.

It sounds insane, but this is the biggest key to making the whole inkle thing work on the Mirrix loom.

Trust me. You ~can~ twist your yarns around each other, and are welcome to, I’m sure, if that would make you happy….

BUT…. the quickest, easiest way to have problem free warping for inkle is to cut those little darlin’s and tie the knots between the colors.

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Yay! Warped!  Insert the spring rod into the spring to keep the warp strands locked into their notches.

This is sooooooooooo important!  (yep… voice of ‘oops’ experience here 😦 )

And in Part 2…. it’s on to the heddles.

I have a nifty, super friendly way of using a crochet hook and weaving stick to make the heddling process go like a breeze.

That’s coming up next…. so stay tuned! 🙂

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Filed under Loom & looms & small loom weaving, Mirrix loom, tutorial & how to, Uncategorized, video tutorial, weaving & handwoven

The story of my Saori loom and a new shirt for my husband

Last year, I wove my husband a shirt to wear while his Jazz trio performed at the Jazz festival and other gigs. Link to Jim’s shirt

It’s time to weave him a new shirt!

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So, I have warped up my Saori floor loom and have started weaving the yardage for his shirt, and maybe some for one for me, too… we shall see….

The loom in the photo has a neat story.  Her name is Toshi-san.

I bought her several years ago from my dear friend, Terri Bibby, who is a master Saori weaver- check out her website: Link

When Terri announced, a few weeks ago, that she is hosting a Saori weaving conference in September 2012 on Salt Spring Island: Announcement

she received a lovely email from the lady who originally bought Toshi-san in Japan in 1990.

She went to the first international Saori weaving conference in Kobe, Japan, fell in love with Saori weaving, and bought a loom.

They took Toshi-san apart, and shipped her to Canada in little pieces, which she then re-assembled.

Later, she sold Toshi-san to a weaving dealer in British Columbia, who sold Toshi-san to Terri.

When I walked into Terri’s studio not long after Toshi-san arrived, it was love at first sight, and I bought Toshi-san on the spot.

I wove like mad on Toshi-san for a couple of years, but then got involved with other looms and she sat empty and neglected.

I felt guilty about her being abandoned, so I thought that I might sell her.

Luckily, my daughter-in-law said- DON’T!!!! And she took custody of Toshi-san.

She wove merrily away on Toshi-san for awhile, but then spinning and making roving with her hackle and combs became more and more of a passion.  She discovered that she’s not a weaver, but is a passionate spinner.

So, Toshi- san sat unused again…. but I was feeling sooooooooo called to her…………. so, now, she is happily ensconced back in my studio!

Yay! Toshi-san! Welcome back!

and…. now, I am having soooooooooooo much fun, weaving Jim’s new shirt.

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I have a fondness for weaving inlays, so Jim’s shirt is going to have a lot of random squares and other shapes inlaid:

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I love the philosophy of Saori weaving- it’s based in the belief of generosity of spirit, and exploring creativity and freeform expression.

It’s completely meditative and contemplative.

I follow my inclination to work with this color or that, and place shapes here and there, and allow the weaving to grow in a very organic way.

The bands for the shirt, and the cuffs and collars are also coming along on my Cricket loom-

I posted about my excitement in mastering the double hole rigid heddle loom yesterday:  Double hole rigid heddle

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All in all, it’s a complete expression of love and delight and a celebration of my adoration for my soul mate, the wonderful man that has been my beloved husband for more than 3 decades 😀

Here’s a picture of Jim (wearing the shirt that I wove for him for last year’s jazz festival) and his trio.

You have to look hard to see the bass player- he’s wearing black and it makes him kind of invisible.

I was holding our gorgeous grandbaby, who fell asleep while Grampa and the guys played.

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Yep… that’s one of my Saori Gypsy jackets that I wove.  Link

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Filed under Loom & looms & small loom weaving, weaving & handwoven