Monthly Archives: January 2012

Can Edward and Anastasia Bear be knitted with thicker yarn and larger needles?

Yes! They can!

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Edward and Anastasia Bear are 2 little bears that I have designed for ‘Your Knitting Life’ magazine (formerly known as ‘Knitting Today’), and they’ve been in each issue of the magazine since it started.

They are small… they’re 6 inches tall, and are knitted on 2.75 mm needles using Regia sock yarn.

Recently, on Ravelry, someone asked if Edward and Anastasia could be made larger, and the answer is, ‘You betcha’!

The humungous Edward Bear in the photo is 18 inches tall.  If you knit with 8 or 9 mm needles and super bulky yarn or 2 strands of medium weight yarn held together, you will get one very large Edward Bear!  Stitch through the hips to make them bendable.

The pattern for the basic Edward is available for free from the ‘Your Knitting Life’ website: Edward pattern link.

You can see pics of the all Edward and Anastasia installments here: Pics

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Can you weave tapestry on potholder loom? why, yes!

One of my Ravelry buddies just shared photos of a lovely little tapestry loom that he’s built.

He then commented that Noreen would probably say that you can weave tapestries on her beloved potholder looms.

And, of course, I chirrupped up: “Funny you should mention that, but Y E S you can! ”

Last year, after the devastation of the earthquakes and tsunami in Japan, I was very upset, and sat down with my sketchbook.

I did a little drawing that made me sit up and say: “I could weave that!”

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So, I whipped out my Harrisville potholder loom (Link to Harrisville) and cut a square of cardboard to fit inside it.

I made a cartoon of the basic elements of the drawing: A circle inside a square, and taped it to the cardboard.

I decided to use all Harrisville yarns and fibers in this piece, so I warped up with warp yarn from Harrisville.

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I used a table fork to beat the weft strands:

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When I was finished, I wove an inkle border on my Schacht Inkle loom

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I saw how the circle could become a face, so I warped up, again, and wove this:

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And, this face made me think of the sun, so of course, I had to weave a companion,

‘Song to the Moon’: woven with yarn from my stash

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Normally, I dislike fringes, but this piece demanded them, so I faithfully added them.

I was intrigued by weaving the expressive little faces (remember, the potholder loom yields a woven piece that is 6 inches square)

so…. with handspun yarn and stash yarn, I wove this little tapestry:

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I have been meaning to block these little tapestries, but have been busy with so many other things that I haven’t gotten around to it.

But, when Misha joked about me weaving tapestries on the potholder loom, I thought…

“Well, they’re not blocked, but so what! I’ll post a note about them anyhow!”

So, when my ‘to do’ list calms down a little, I will, um…. I might get them blocked!

Until then, keep on weaving! I am….  😀

And, don’t forget to check out my other potholder loom weaving on my website: LINK

Please remember that this post is copyright protected, so please don’t copy the images etc! Thanks so much~!

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Weave a Mermaid with the stick weaving loom

I love mermaids, and I never get tired of finding new ways to create more of them.

And, now, my newest mermaid is woven – on only 6 sticks!

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Weaving sticks are probably the easiest loom ever – but that doesn’t mean that there is ANY  limit to their creative potential.

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I have been having a wonderful time, designing all kinds of magical dolls with them.

I have just released the first of a series of VERY fun patterns for them-

The Mermaid….

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I’ve woven these mermaids with hand spun yarn made by my beautiful daughter in law, LINK

using the  Weaving Stick loom kit from Lee Valley:USA Link  Canadian Link

If you are in Europe or England, you can buy weaving sticks from Suzanne in her etsy shop: LINK

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The pattern is available on my website at:MERMAID

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By the way, there’s a wonderful group on Ravelry that is all about weaving with sticks and pegs: LINK

Here’s to Mermaids, and here’s to weaving, and, of course, here’s to sticks and string!!!  😀

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etsy love

I love etsy.

Oh the goodies you can find there! Oh my!

Look what just arrived in my mailbox:

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Isn’t this a gorgeous shawl pin? I bought it in  Kate Heck’s etsy shop. LINK

Kate and I found out about each other’s work when we were chatting about looms and weaving, courtesy of one of the online weaving groups we both belong to.

Ah, the wonders of the internet! We looked at each other’s links, and ahem, pretty quickly, some shopping ensued! LOL!

She made it from Cocobolo wood, which I love.

It’s beautifully made and the craftsmanship is just superb.

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Here it is on my pink stole that I made for my Lily Speed-O-Weave loom book: LINK  Poifeck!

By the way, I have an etsy shop, too….  Link

etsy is amazing and wonderful…. and sooooooooo much fun, especially when you find gorgeous handmade treasures that you just would not find anywhere else!

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Minoan Goddess of the Bees Knitted pattern is now a pdf

Poor little Minoan Goddess of the Bees!  She wasn’t being at all well served!

This morning, I received an email, and a pm, from someone who was right ticked off with a terrible photo that was up on my website.

It was a tiny photo of my knitted Minoan Goddess of the Bees.

OOPS!

So, I spent the day, not only re-doing the photo, but building a beautiful new pdf of the knitting pattern for the Minoan Goddess of the Bees.

She looks lovely now!

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Many years ago, I was reading a book about ancient Greece.

There were a couple of tiny drawings of little figures that were engraved on pottery and furniture from Crete about 1700 BCE.

I fell in love with the tiny images and have been working with them ever since.

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They were called, ‘Minoan Dewdrop or Bee Goddesses’ sacred to the goddess, Persephone.

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They are known as ‘Melisae’.

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The pattern for the knitted Minoan Goddess of the Bees is available at: http://www.crone-findlay.com/knitteddollpatterns.html

 

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Free pattern for a woven elephant

The pattern has gone live for the
Woven Elephant that I designed for Lion Brand on the Martha Stewart loom
 HERE’S THE LINK TO IT

She’s a cutie!

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I love elephants…..

happy weaving! 😀

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More little looms from recycled stuff part 2

If you are teaching a child to weave, or just want an impromptu, no cost small loom for sampling yarns and colorways,  this little loom is very handy.

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The project on the foam food tray loom is a bookmark, but you can weave amulet bags,  rug mugs, small dolls and toys,  doll house rugs or squares that you stitch together to make larger projects.

It’s great for traveling, as it’s light, and if you use a plastic darning needle for weaving, it’s fine to take through airport security.

Yesterday, I posted part one of the recycled and upcycled looms: Here’s the link:  PART ONE

I think that one of the most accessible looms for beginning weavers is the  weaving stick loom.

I am doing a lot of designing for it – here’s my post about the mermaid to weave on the stick weaving loom: LINK

Happy Weaving!!!!

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Little looms from recycled things for teaching weaving or sampling etc part 1

Yesterday, I posted about teaching children to weave Link

One of the pleasures of weaving is that it can be done with tremendously complex machines, but, can also be done with small bits of this and that from around the house.

Today and tomorrow, I am going to be posting little how to’s on making recycled and upcycled looms that are great for teaching kids how to weave,  or just for noodling about with sampling yarns and weaving little bags, or hacky sacks or bookmarks….

So, here’s today’s installment:

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If you make each grid square 1/4 inch, then the loom is  business card size, which is a charming size to work with, and to pop into a pocket or bag.

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If you weave 2 tiny rectangles on the loom, and stitch them together, then add a beaded fringe, it makes a very pleasing little amulet bag.

I think that one of the most accessible looms for beginning weavers is the  weaving stick loom.

I am doing a lot of designing for it – here’s my post about the mermaid to weave on the stick weaving loom: LINK

Happy weaving!

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When should a child start learning how to weave?

It’s never too early, (or too late!) for a child to start learning how to weave.

I bought my daughter her first loom when she was 6 weeks old. It was a little Spears loom #2 from England.

And, when my daughter and son were little,   I had several looms set up for them to weave on, whenever they felt inspired to weave.

And, now, my grandson weaves with me:

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He’s been sitting in my lap at the loom since he was born, and he really gets what weaving is all about.

He’s helping me weave his Grampa’s Saori shirt:

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He’s two now, and he KNOWS about the shuttle!

He demanded the shuttle, and put it into the shed, and helped it across with his beautiful little chubby hands….

He LOVES the bobbin winder:

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His grampa will certainly feel the love that has been woven into this shirt!

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What do I recommend about teaching children to weave?

You don’t need a loom to start teaching a child to weave-  cardboard looms and foam meat trays are great.

(I’ll post some patterns and instructions for them)

Child friendly looms are great- the Cricket is wonderful, as are a whole slew of small looms- ESPECIALLY,

the wonderful potholder loom!

BUT- I DO NOT recommend trying to teach a child to weave with loopers on the potholder loom.

Loops are actually rather challenging to work with.

Yarn is much more user friendly, and I have all kinds of YouTube videos to help you get children weaving.

When you click on my Potholder loom weaving page on my webiste: LINKIE

and scan down to the bottom of the page, you will find all kinds of YouTube links for my video tutorials.

I recommend the book: 1,2,3 Easy as Can Be Critters to weave on the potholder loom

and  Weavagarumi  for beginning weavers.

So, go ahead, and get those kidlets weaving!

It’ll be the gift that keeps on giving, as they will be embarking on a magnificent voyage of discovery that will last their lifetime!

Happy Weaving! 😀

 

 

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My learning curve with the double hole rigid heddle continues

This morning, an email came in, explaining that I am STILL not getting the double hole rigid heddle weaving right…

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She pointed out that I am doing weft face weaving here, while the double hole rigid heddle are normally used to create WARP faced bands…

oops.

She also told me to not pick up the background threads on the even rows when the pattern threads are all in the up position.

I’ve tried that, and once again I have ugly long floats on the back of the weaving.

Hmmmm.

I really like the weft face weaving for the shirt that I am weaving, so I am going to continue weaving weft face.

And, I am stumped on the float thing.

When I did it ‘wrong’ and picked up the background threads, too, I got lovely reversible bands….

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I am feeling very frustrated, so I am just going to get back to work, meeting design deadlines, and will try again later.

Update:  I sent her a note  in response to her suggestion to drop the background threads…. going ‘ackkkkkkkkkk’……

She sent me a note back this evening, saying, Oops… you did have it right! Just couldn’t see it in the video!

So I am feeling VERY relieved. I had gone back and done more weaving, returning to my previous way of keeping the background threads in the shed, and once again, the floats disappeared and the back of the band is lovely and reversible.

Well, it’s NOT reversible and it’s a good thing that  I am going to be stitching it to the shirt, because the back of the band is a progression of  floatie bits and woven in bits!

Once the shirt is done, those chronicles of “the learning experience” will disappear against the shirt, never revealing their untidy little secrets!

AND… Yep, the weft face is not the accepted norm, but, I like it, and I am going to carry on in the wrong way, as I find it quite fetching 😀

I find it just fascinating that there are soooooooooooo many variables in this intriguing technique!

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